Archive for the ‘Main’ Category

Boat Watch

This is a message sent via Devon and Cornwall Alert. This information has been sent on behalf of Devon and Cornwall Police

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Message sent by
Linzi Berryman (Police, Community Messaging Officer, De)

Dear Boat Watch member

It is the time of year we typically see an increase in reported marine crime and I request you remain vigilant and report any suspicious, unusual activity or marine crimes which may occur.
I would like to take this opportunity to remind you of Project Kraken and request you keep us updated with any information which may be of use to us.

Project Kraken – a joint initiative now being delivered by the NCA, Border Force and police forces – aims to increase public reporting and strengthen the general maritime industry’s response to the threats.
We want you to report any unusual or suspicious behaviour in these and other maritime environments. No matter how trivial it may seem; if it looks out of the ordinary, we want to know about it.
Whether you work in the maritime industries, are a keen sailor, or are just walking along the coast, your local knowledge and your experience of the maritime world means you are well placed to spot anything unusual.
By working together we can help to prevent terrorists and organised criminals posing a threat to your neighbours, your pastimes, your businesses and your livelihoods.
They will exploit any opening they find.
How you can help
We want you to report any unusual or suspicious activity near the coastline and in maritime environments.
This could include, among others:

Boats with names or identification numbers painted out, altered or erased.
People or packages landed or disembarked from boats in unusual locations and transferred into waiting vehicles. Why are they suspicious? Note times, locations, descriptions of vessels, persons, including boat names, sail numbers, hull colours or other distinctive markings. If vehicles are seen note make, registration, colour and nationality.
Boats moving late at night or early in the morning in suspicious circumstances, showing little or no navigational lighting or signalling to persons or vehicles ashore.
Boats which may be overloaded, appear low in the water, contain people who do not appear to be able to handle the vessel or are inadequately dressed for the prevailing weather conditions.
Boats containing people who appear to be engaged in unusual boat handling techniques such as recovering swimmers or divers from the water.
Rigid inflatable boats moving at unusual times or seen in unusual locations and fitted with extra fuel tanks.
Suspicious requests to buy or store large amounts of fuel, satellite navigational equipment, gas bottles, chemicals, uniforms or badges.
Suspicious or unfamiliar persons seen in marinas or coastal areas carrying tools, paying attention to or taking photographs of vessels with high value items such as engines and electronic navigational equipment.
Suspicious persons who ask questions about security procedures or who are observed filming/taking photographs/making notes or drawing diagrams of: military/police/security facilities, vulnerable public areas such as bridges, tourist attractions, shopping, restaurant or passenger processing, embarkation/disembarkation routes at cruise ship, ferry terminals or docking facilities.
Suspicious persons seen to abandon a vehicle onboard a ferry and walk ashore or who leave a vehicle in an unusual position in areas of high volume public or passenger access.
Suspicious vessels observed entering maritime restricted areas or seen in close proximity to large cargo or passenger vessels whilst underway or at anchor.
Suspicious persons seeking unusual instruction on the water such as diving, hiring powerboats, inflatable RHIBS or yachts. Who are they and where are they from? Obtain as much information as possible.
Crew who show signs of nervousness or a lack of awareness of maritime protocols and customs.
Vessels showing signs of unusual modification or minor damage.
Increased activity at isolated coastal locations or at unusual times of the day.
Any attempts to signal to vessels offshore or guide them into an unusual landfall.
Strange patterns of payment, such as large amounts of cash.
What should you do?
If you see unusual or suspicious activity, report it to your local police on 101, or anonymously to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 and quote ‘Project Kraken’.
Record as much information as you can – the smallest detail could be significant. Do not take direct action against any individuals or groups.
If it is an emergency or you require immediate Police attendance, call 999

Beach watch data on marine litter collection (2016)

 

The full research report behind this summary is available on the Research Report page of this website.

NEW YEAR’S DAY TIDAL ROAD CLEAN UP

Our ever popular  clean up will be held from 2-3pm on Sunday 1st January 2017– weather permitting.  Feel free to bring your friends and guests to help out.  We’ll meet at both ‘Timbers’ car park (Aveton Gifford) and the Milburn Orchard car park (at the Bigbury end of the Tidal Road) with the two groups planning to meet in the middle!

Please bring any old sacks, etc. to collect the rubbish and follow our  safety guidelines  at http://auneconservation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/ACA-BEACH-CLEANS3.pdf

Water Mills on the Devon Avon

Click on this link for an account , by Don Gaskins of the Devon Rural Skills Trust & ACA, of a recent talk by Joddy Chapman.

Watermills on South Devon

 

MICROPLASTICS AND MARINE LITTER – TALK

Nigel Mortimer of the AONB has sent this message and link to a recent talk by Prof Richard Thompson.:-

During Science Week, earlier this year, I invited you to a couple of talks on plastics ‘The Good, the Bad & the Ugly’ kindly hosted by the Kingsbridge Community College.

Professor Richard Thompson from Plymouth University was one of the two excellent speakers, talking on “Marine Litter: are there solutions to this global environmental problem ?”

Professor Thompson gave a very similar talk to members of the Marine Biological Association last Friday and due to Global demand, the talk was recorded. If you’d like to watch it yourself, here is the link;

www.mba.ac.uk/2016/11/16/microplastics-talk-by-richard-thompson

Richard spoke to the ACA some years ago but his story about microplastics has moved on somewhat since then.  I attended the talk at Kingsbridge College referred to by Nigel and found it fascinating.   An outline is provided below.:-
Marine Litter is a global environmental problem with consequences for human health, the economy and wildlife.  This litter is pervasive throughout our oceans form the poles to the equator and from sea surface and shoreline to the deep sea. It is hazardous to seafarers resulting in unnecessary coastguard and rescue callouts and has substantial economic consequences for the local authorities responsible for clean-up. Perhaps most widely documented are encounters with wildlife which can result in direct harm and death. Well over 600 species of marine organisms are reported to encounter marine litter and the majority of these encounters are with plastic items.

However, marine litter is an environmental problem that can be solved. The majority of the items that become marine litter are single use disposable items including packaging and sewage related debris. Such items can bring considerable societal benefit, for example in terms of food security and light weighting to reduce fuel usage, however these benefits can all be realised without the need for any  emissions of litter to the ocean.  Hence the long term solutions lie in recognising that if designed, used and disposed of appropriately, then end-of-life items that currently accumulate in waste management facilities and as litter in the natural environment can be used as a resource for production of new products. Working toward a circular economy of this kind will help reduce our reliance on non-renewable resources and simultaneously reduce the quantity of waste requiring disposal.